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  • Dry practice

    Hey Folks,

    I can't begin to tell you how important dry practice is. If done correctly your skill level will go through the roof! To tell the truth it's perfect practice. Why? Well, lets see......no wind, no recoil, no rain, no ammo, no conditions at all! That makes it perfect practice.

    Here's how you should IMHO start: Find a place away from your gun room where you can lay down (if using your rifle) and see outside. Place all your ammo in your gun room well away from your practice area. Make sure your weapon is not loaded. If using your pistol make sure you place a target in an area that could take a round safely if an accident occurred. (that's why I prefer practicing somewhere not close to the gun room.)

    If using your rifle, find a place comfortable, using your bipod and rear bag place the weapon to where you can see outside. Bring the rifle back into your shoulder fairly tight (not to the point where your shaking) and get a good solid cheek weld. Find a target like a knot hole in a tree, nail head in a fence something again that has a good back stop. Practice as follows:

    1) make sure you have "no" parallax. I like to align my scope on the target and then without toughing the rifle move my head back and forth until my crosshairs do not move. This puts both my scope and target on the same focal plane.

    2) Once your crosshairs are on the target and locked in, close your eye's for 5 seconds. You should be in the middle of the target upon opening them. If your crosshairs are to the left of the target move your body 1" to the left and recheck and vise versa to the right. This is also the time to make any adjustments in your stocks length of pull and check weld.

    3) Snap caps: I like using snap caps because it's simulates using bullets and the mechanics of loading.

    4) Once locked in on the target, with your crosshairs I'll say to myself "Shooter ready", then "spotter ready". This is just good range protocol for stay in practice once your with a spotter or instructor.

    5) then place your finger on the trigger and press hold, press hold, until the trigger breaks. Every time your trigger breaks it should be a surprise. DO NOT COMPROMISE ON YOUR CROSSHAIR, keep it aligned with the target as you press hold, press hold on the trigger.

    6) as the trigger breaks your crosshair should be on the center of the target. Watch to see if they move as the trigger breaks.

    7) without raising your head, rack the bolt and start over.

    The first week practice about 15 minutes a day (or night) five nights a week. The next week push your practice to 20 minutes and the week after to 30 minutes. You will see after the end of the first week your eye relief and hand placements will be right on the money. This also builds muscle memory.

    Eventually the mechanics of practicing will over come your brains urge to jerk the trigger. If you remember each time to press hold, press hold on the trigger your repeatability will go through the roof. It's a matter of doing the same thing each time, over and over again.

    Pretty much the same for the pistol, carbine and shotgun except you will need to choose a stance for each weapon. If you practice sight alignment and trigger control your shot placement will be right where you want it. Dry practice will help you with each weapon become a more solid marksman.

    Have fun with this and at the same time you will build your repeatability with all weapons.

    Take care, flea
    "with the patience of an oyster....I watch and wait"

    Training the US, one shooter at a time.






    http://www.centralvirginiatactical.com

  • #2
    Hey brother, thanks for putting this together for everyone. New shooters take note, this is just a tiny tidbit of information that you would learn by taking a training course with Master Flea. He's provided it here for you for free.
    America deserves to know her heroes!

    Comment


    • #3
      This is absolutely good practice. I do this all the time when I'm home. I do the same thing with my pistols.

      Anything that develops muscle memory cuts down on the amount of "thinking" and concious correction that is required. That's a "good thing!".
      "Do the right thing even if it means dying like a dog when no one's there to see you do it." Vice Admiral James Stockdale, NAVY PILOT

      "Honor, Integrity, Commitment to core values. When they become abstract concepts or "ideals", all is lost." Me.

      "Character is doing the right thing, even when no one is looking." J.C. Watts

      "I have never seen a projectile turn in flight and come back at the ship that fired it, I cannot however make that same statement regarding missiles." Me.

      Deus lo vult! = "God wills it!"

      Comment


      • #4
        As with Vince and many other fine shooters that have been to CVT have learned, this really works. Three years ago I won the "Long Range Championships", down at Camp Butner, NC. After the match folks asked how many rounds did I fire practicing for this match. Most were shocked to find out that over a two month period I only shot about 50 rounds. However, I explained I spent three weeks prior to the match dry practicing every night for an hour at a time.

        Everyone that has been to CVT know I spend all my time behind the spotting scope and little time shooting. After all that's what you pay me for. So I don't get much trigger time. Dry practicing keeps me sharp because as our skill level grows we find that sight alignment and trigger control are key to repeatable accuracy. Dry practice teaches our brains to keep our crosshairs locked on the target while pressing the trigger until it breaks.

        Now, the rest of the Camp Butner story! I was very proud of that win but not for me personally. You see the second place, third place shooters I had trained as well. Plus the 8th place winner had been to CVT just three weeks prior to the match and this was his first match ever. There were some of the top long range shooters at this match and much praise should go to the top ten shooters. For me seeing this many CVT shooters win tells me my program is still working.

        The gains you will reach by dry practice can't be over stated here. It is perfect practice.

        Take care, flea
        "with the patience of an oyster....I watch and wait"

        Training the US, one shooter at a time.






        http://www.centralvirginiatactical.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks Flea!

          I also dry fire at the range waiting for my barrle to cool between strings.

          James
          "Ever since I was a kid I've had snakes as pets. They're clean and quiet. You give them rodents and they give you pure, unconditional indifference." Carl Hiaasen

          "The Constitution is NOT and instrument for the government to restrain the people, it IS an instrument for the people to restrain the government - lest it come to dominate our lives and interests." - Patrick Henry

          "War was always here. Before man was, war waited for him. The ultimate trade awaiting its ultimate practitioner." ? Cormac McCarthy

          Comment


          • #6
            Hey guys,
            Question, what if you only have about 30/40 feet to dry fire. how can one really get feedback on such short diastance? My reticle doesn't move much, as a matter of fact nothing really moves much at those short distances. I feel like I'm not getting much feedback.
            Ineffective, unfocused violence ,and limp panicky half measures lead to more violence. However, complete, fully thought through,
            professional, well executed violence never leads to more violence, because afterwards, all the other guys are dead. "On Combat"

            Comment


            • #7
              Use really small targets at that distance. When I first got out of the Corps I was dry firing in my 1BR apartment. All you're really concerned with is the reticle. When the firing pin drops, you should have no movement whatsoever.
              www.precision-applications.com

              It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

              Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

              "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

              Comment


              • #8
                [quote]
                Use really small targets at that distance. When I first got out of the Corps I was dry firing in my 1BR apartment. All you're really concerned with is the reticle. When the firing pin drops, you should have no movement whatsoever.[/b]
                "No sword? Use a stick. No stick? Use a rock. No rock? Use your fists and feet! Lose your life, but make the enemy pay!"

                Comment


                • #9
                  This doesn't damage the firing pin? I've always been told never dry fire a rifle without a snap cap or other simulated primer or it will eventually damage the firing pin.
                  Hazardous Materials Technician
                  Driver/Operator - Pumper Apparatus
                  Trench Rescue Specialist
                  Firefighter 1001-I-II

                  9/11 - 343 - Never Forget

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Not on any rifle with a spring around the firing pin. You will benefit much from dry firing. It's the best practice you can do with a weapon. Sight alignment and trigger control are key to repeatable accuracy. Use snap caps, along with your dry firing.
                    "with the patience of an oyster....I watch and wait"

                    Training the US, one shooter at a time.






                    http://www.centralvirginiatactical.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Very Good Advise!!!.................
                      XX-Special Forces Assn. (MN
                      Retired Deputy Sheriff
                      SSG Airborne Inf. (Ret

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Like Vern said, isn't necessary on a bolt gun, but I use 'em to also get the practice of properly running the bolt. Without snap caps (I use action proving dummies from Brownell's) you might be building some bad habits you aren't aware of.
                        www.precision-applications.com

                        It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

                        Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

                        "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I teach that as you advance in your training, it's good when you dry fire to also practice running your scope turrets up and down. Both elevation and windage. Keep your cheek weld and use your off hand to make the adjustments. Like Shep said using the snap caps builds skill. All, these practices will improve your skill sets. Whatever, you do don't break that cheek weld.

                          I have guys with mags load them while on the rifle as well. Anything you can do without movement is key to your success.
                          "with the patience of an oyster....I watch and wait"

                          Training the US, one shooter at a time.






                          http://www.centralvirginiatactical.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            [quote]
                            Hey Folks,

                            I can't begin to tell you how important dry practice is. If done correctly your skill level will go through the roof! To tell the truth it's perfect practice. Why? Well, lets see......no wind, no recoil, no rain, no ammo, no conditions at all! That makes it perfect practice.

                            Here's how you should IMHO start: Find a place away from your gun room where you can lay down (if using your rifle) and see outside. Place all your ammo in your gun room well away from your practice area. Make sure your weapon is not loaded. If using your pistol make sure you place a target in an area that could take a round safely if an accident occurred. (that's why I prefer practicing somewhere not close to the gun room.)

                            If using your rifle, find a place comfortable, using your bipod and rear bag place the weapon to where you can see outside. Bring the rifle back into your shoulder fairly tight (not to the point where your shaking) and get a good solid cheek weld. Find a target like a knot hole in a tree, nail head in a fence something again that has a good back stop. Practice as follows:

                            1) make sure you have "no" parallax. I like to align my scope on the target and then without toughing the rifle move my head back and forth until my crosshairs do not move. This puts both my scope and target on the same focal plane.

                            2) Once your crosshairs are on the target and locked in, close your eye's for 5 seconds. You should be in the middle of the target upon opening them. If your crosshairs are to the left of the target move your body 1" to the left and recheck and vise versa to the right. This is also the time to make any adjustments in your stocks length of pull and check weld.

                            3) Snap caps: I like using snap caps because it's simulates using bullets and the mechanics of loading.

                            4) Once locked in on the target, with your crosshairs I'll say to myself "Shooter ready", then "spotter ready". This is just good range protocol for stay in practice once your with a spotter or instructor.

                            5) then place your finger on the trigger and press hold, press hold, until the trigger breaks. Every time your trigger breaks it should be a surprise. DO NOT COMPROMISE ON YOUR CROSSHAIR, keep it aligned with the target as you press hold, press hold on the trigger.

                            6) as the trigger breaks your crosshair should be on the center of the target. Watch to see if they move as the trigger breaks.

                            7) without raising your head, rack the bolt and start over.

                            The first week practice about 15 minutes a day (or night) five nights a week. The next week push your practice to 20 minutes and the week after to 30 minutes. You will see after the end of the first week your eye relief and hand placements will be right on the money. This also builds muscle memory.

                            Eventually the mechanics of practicing will over come your brains urge to jerk the trigger. If you remember each time to press hold, press hold on the trigger your repeatability will go through the roof. It's a matter of doing the same thing each time, over and over again.

                            Pretty much the same for the pistol, carbine and shotgun except you will need to choose a stance for each weapon. If you practice sight alignment and trigger control your shot placement will be right where you want it. Dry practice will help you with each weapon become a more solid marksman.

                            Have fun with this and at the same time you will build your repeatability with all weapons.

                            Take care, flea[/b]
                            You Forgot the silly things I learned.

                            The Deep Breathing.

                            The "arch of the crosshairs as your heart beats".

                            The Timing as the hairs cross under the target.

                            The "stop".

                            That finger tip touching the very end of the trigger tip.....

                            The pulled up drag, and the slip.

                            The "Zen" moment as your round passes through the last ones spot.....

                            and having to reposition because a hard-on isnt a factor in a prone position!

                            Yeah....I LOVE SHOOTING!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              [quote]
                              <div class='quotemain'>Hey Folks,

                              I can't begin to tell you how important dry practice is. If done correctly your skill level will go through the roof! To tell the truth it's perfect practice. Why? Well, lets see......no wind, no recoil, no rain, no ammo, no conditions at all! That makes it perfect practice.

                              Here's how you should IMHO start: Find a place away from your gun room where you can lay down (if using your rifle) and see outside. Place all your ammo in your gun room well away from your practice area. Make sure your weapon is not loaded. If using your pistol make sure you place a target in an area that could take a round safely if an accident occurred. (that's why I prefer practicing somewhere not close to the gun room.)

                              If using your rifle, find a place comfortable, using your bipod and rear bag place the weapon to where you can see outside. Bring the rifle back into your shoulder fairly tight (not to the point where your shaking) and get a good solid cheek weld. Find a target like a knot hole in a tree, nail head in a fence something again that has a good back stop. Practice as follows:

                              1) make sure you have "no" parallax. I like to align my scope on the target and then without toughing the rifle move my head back and forth until my crosshairs do not move. This puts both my scope and target on the same focal plane.

                              2) Once your crosshairs are on the target and locked in, close your eye's for 5 seconds. You should be in the middle of the target upon opening them. If your crosshairs are to the left of the target move your body 1" to the left and recheck and vise versa to the right. This is also the time to make any adjustments in your stocks length of pull and check weld.

                              3) Snap caps: I like using snap caps because it's simulates using bullets and the mechanics of loading.

                              4) Once locked in on the target, with your crosshairs I'll say to myself "Shooter ready", then "spotter ready". This is just good range protocol for stay in practice once your with a spotter or instructor.

                              5) then place your finger on the trigger and press hold, press hold, until the trigger breaks. Every time your trigger breaks it should be a surprise. DO NOT COMPROMISE ON YOUR CROSSHAIR, keep it aligned with the target as you press hold, press hold on the trigger.

                              6) as the trigger breaks your crosshair should be on the center of the target. Watch to see if they move as the trigger breaks.

                              7) without raising your head, rack the bolt and start over.

                              The first week practice about 15 minutes a day (or night) five nights a week. The next week push your practice to 20 minutes and the week after to 30 minutes. You will see after the end of the first week your eye relief and hand placements will be right on the money. This also builds muscle memory.

                              Eventually the mechanics of practicing will over come your brains urge to jerk the trigger. If you remember each time to press hold, press hold on the trigger your repeatability will go through the roof. It's a matter of doing the same thing each time, over and over again.

                              Pretty much the same for the pistol, carbine and shotgun except you will need to choose a stance for each weapon. If you practice sight alignment and trigger control your shot placement will be right where you want it. Dry practice will help you with each weapon become a more solid marksman.

                              Have fun with this and at the same time you will build your repeatability with all weapons.

                              Take care, flea[/b]
                              You Forgot the silly things I learned.

                              The Deep Breathing.

                              The "arch of the crosshairs as your heart beats".

                              The Timing as the hairs cross under the target.

                              The "stop".

                              That finger tip touching the very end of the trigger tip.....

                              The pulled up drag, and the slip.

                              The "Zen" moment as your round passes through the last ones spot.....

                              and having to reposition because a hard-on isnt a factor in a prone position!

                              Yeah....I LOVE SHOOTING!
                              [/b]

                              BTW......YOUR RIGHT! Nothing better as long as your not tearing up a firing pin, how long do those snaps last anyway???

                              Comment

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