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NORTH KOREAN TYPE 63 CARBINE AMMO POUCHES

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  • NORTH KOREAN TYPE 63 CARBINE AMMO POUCHES

    The North Korean Type 63 Carbine (SKS) us still in service with North Korean militia and farmer units. The carbine itself is locally made in North Korea and very similar to the Soviet made carbines with only minor differences in stock fittings and the inclusion of a detachable grenade launcher.4.jpg

    We came across and added a set of ammo pouches for this weapon to our collection very recently in about unissued condition. The three pouch belt rig is very similar to the Japanese style pouches with two front pouches worn to the left and right of the belt buckle with a third pouch hanging lower at the center back. The pouches are made of a vinyl like material to look like leather helfd closed by leather straps .
    1.JPG

    The belt and pouches are Chinese made and supplied to North Korea as AID items. All are marked on the inner "lid"..
    2.JPG

    Each pouch holds four 10 round charger clips made of blue steel that fit into the charger guide of the carbine's bolt carrier. giving a 120 round total that is inline with the typical ammo load out of that era.
    3.JPG

    The Type 63 Carbine is still in use by KPA honor guards, militia, farm and factory units and small "reserve" units. We have also seen this belt and pouches worn by those armed with AK style weapons using the charger clips with a charger guide similar to those used with the M-16 to load the 30 round AK magazines. Keep in mind NOTHING is ever retired in the KPA lol, so this along with even the old PpSh41 is still in the field, heck we even saw Japanese Type 38 rifles still in use along with the Type 30 bayonets ! We hope you find this tidbit from our collection of interest.

    Take care...Jim & Soo-jin
    Last edited by JY; 08-02-2016, 02:36 AM.
    "A FAMILY THAT STANDS TOGETHER AND FIGHTS TOGETHER STAYS TOGETHER" The combined Dutch Family...


    "But I've a rendezvous with Death, at midnight in some flaming town, when spring trips north again this year, and I to my pledge word am true, I shall not fail that rendezvous"

    Alan Seeger, KIA Belloy-en-Santerre 4 July 1916, Legion Entrangere, American poet.



  • #2
    Where are they getting ammo for a Japanese type 38?! Local manufacture or import? I noticed that 7.62x39 looks like some of the Russian import we get here.

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    • #3
      Hi;

      Korea was occupied by the Japanese from 1905 to 1945 and there were several Japanese arsenals in Korea and Manchuria that manufactured arms and ammunition two of the bigger were Jinsen Arsenal in the Inchon area that was taken over after the war by US forces and used as a depot called ASCOM City another was Mukden Arsenal in Manchuria. which continued making both new weapons and ammunition after the war. Both China and the constabularies of Korea (North and south) used Japanese material long after the war. This along with large stocks left over from the Japanese occupation are still in use by lesser grade units in the North. During my first tour here the KPA "DMZ Police" inside the DMZ had the Japanese service rifles and Type 30 bayonets. Chinese forces used Japanese style ammo pouches for the M-91 ammunition for years, just modified for the much more tapered cartridge. I have one somewhere if I find it Ill post a photo of it, it came from a sniper armed with a M-91/30 sniper rifle with a PU optic. A side note, most of the North Korean military in the beginning were either from the Chinese Communist forces or the Japanese Army, they carried on a lot of the Japanese traditions and fighting styles.

      The 7.62X39mm ammunition s from our stocks for range use and other uses. Both 7.62X39mm ammunition and AK 20 and 30 round along with drum magazines are manufactured here in the ROK, rather useful when you live across the border from a big time user LOL! Russian, Chinese and Finnish 7.62X39mm show up from time to time also.

      Korea is a very interesting area for military history and you never know what will show up. We've into MP-40's, MAT-49's even some converted to the 7.72X25mm round lol! I added a couple nice condition Type 30 bayonets from both Jinsen and Mukden arsenals to my collection not to long ago.. Not much is thrown away or scrapped if serviceable. A few years back we fired some of the old 6.5 mm Japanese ammunition and it functioned perfectly though made in 1944.

      Well off subject lol! But we hope informative to you!

      Take care...Jim & Soo-jin. Paju, ROK
      "A FAMILY THAT STANDS TOGETHER AND FIGHTS TOGETHER STAYS TOGETHER" The combined Dutch Family...


      "But I've a rendezvous with Death, at midnight in some flaming town, when spring trips north again this year, and I to my pledge word am true, I shall not fail that rendezvous"

      Alan Seeger, KIA Belloy-en-Santerre 4 July 1916, Legion Entrangere, American poet.


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      • #4
        I was recently reading David Halberstam's book on the Korean War. Some of the first Chinese troops to invade along with the North Koreans were using Thompson Submachine Guns they had either captured from Nationalist troops or bought from them during the Chinese revolution prior to 1950. Remember, we supplied Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalist forces during WWII.
        "Kill evil. It's how quality of life is achieved. Carry on."---Ted Nugent

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        • #5
          Hi John;

          Yep and they still show up at times. North Korea has just obtained enough NEW GE GAUs to arm their coastal patrol boats with them and equip mech units on the DMZ with ground mounted guns. Wonder who sold them brand new guns made in USA??????

          take care...Jim & Soo-jin
          "A FAMILY THAT STANDS TOGETHER AND FIGHTS TOGETHER STAYS TOGETHER" The combined Dutch Family...


          "But I've a rendezvous with Death, at midnight in some flaming town, when spring trips north again this year, and I to my pledge word am true, I shall not fail that rendezvous"

          Alan Seeger, KIA Belloy-en-Santerre 4 July 1916, Legion Entrangere, American poet.


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          • #6
            Pics look good Jim. Awesome information. Thanks.
            "Do the right thing even if it means dying like a dog when no one's there to see you do it." Vice Admiral James Stockdale, NAVY PILOT

            "Honor, Integrity, Commitment to core values. When they become abstract concepts or "ideals", all is lost." Me.

            "Character is doing the right thing, even when no one is looking." J.C. Watts

            "I have never seen a projectile turn in flight and come back at the ship that fired it, I cannot however make that same statement regarding missiles." Me.

            Deus lo vult! = "God wills it!"

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