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Mountain Combat Boots

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  • Mountain Combat Boots

    There is a thread about boots in "other gear". there's a lot lot of misconceptions of what is needed to be a useful "Mountain Combat Boot".ALL Mountain Combat Boots are basicly a class "C" mountain boot. They are "stiff" boots, not as ridgid as hardshells thought. They are built to support your foot and ankles when carrying heavy rucks in rough rocky terrain. The stiffness also aids them when using ice crampons, snowshoes, treking ski's and when edging during a climb. All will have a scree collar, a padded collar that keeps the loose pebbles and talc out of your boot. A 90 degree heel, to keep your foot from slipping in that scree, and a very secure lacing system to keep the boots tight. Also they will have an impact absorbing "rand" around the boot to shield you feet and toes from being injured by impacts with rocks...all mountains have foot biting rocks A bit of sizing information, moubntain boots are usually, and I say usually bigger than the stated size by 1/2 to 1 full size to accomodate BOOT SOCKS. It's best to try them on with the sock you will wear with them...bring your own socks, most places that have mountain boots will have lender socks to try your boots on with, and a LOT of people use them lol.

    A bit of a warning iss needed here. When you are going to be in the mountains for extended periods ALWAY carry a pair of light hiking boots in you ruck, always, they will feel a lot better when your just walking aropund or in camp than the stiff mountain boots. Try to stay away from the nylon stuff it keeps your sweaty/wet and in the cold can cause frostbite, leather is better. Again test fit them with the socks you will wear with them. Socks are a whole other story, just keep in mind layering an anti friction sock and an insulating/cushioning sock is the normal set up and wool still works great.

    For a comparison of class "C" Mountain Combat Boots the following is offered. the first two are my favorites and the third is an older style that is very similar to what was issued to Mountain Infantry since WWII.

    Photo one is the Belleville 950 Mountain Combat Boot or MCB. this is the current issue for mountain infantry and Special Forces. These are my new ones and haven't been broken in totally yet. LOL, Soo-jin is always yelling about me "clomping around the house" getting them broke in. ALWAYS break your boots in before you wear them in the hills. The MCB has a gortex bootie built in to help keep your feet dryer, dryer not totally dry, you still have to change your socks and let the won pair to dry when you can. When you're in the high mountains it's most embarassing and not to comfy when you develope frostbite or frozen feet from wet socks.
    [attachment=16045:1.jpg]

    Photo two shows the over al of the soles side profile and the vibrim sole...notice the sharp heel, not beveled that can act like a ski in scree..poetic eh?
    [attachment=16046:3.jpg]

    Photo three shows the scree collar and padded tongue...
    [attachment=16047:4.jpg]

    Photo four the lacing system, the fifth lacing tube up is a special tube that by pulling up locks the lower lacing to keep it from loosening. A safety hint here, wear a light leather glove when lacing your boots the laces when you pulling them tight will give you a great blister
    [attachment=16048:5.jpg]

    I like the Bellevilles a lot they do what they are intended to do and do it well. The only problems we've ever seen with them is the rand sometimes splits on the molded seams. it doesn't put the boot out of action but it shouldn't happen. the current rands are suppossed to have been changed so this won't happen.

    The second boot is one I've worn a lot, the Asolo "Globalline" I don't know if they are still available but if you can find a pair grab them. These are a nice green color and are very low key when observed for the camo conscience
    [attachment=16049:6.jpg]

    This photo shows a side view of the boot with all the standard features of a class "C" boot. For added support Asolo put a hard nylon "strut' to the boot. It looks a bit strange but works. The lacing system uses a pulley assembly to draw the laces tight and the 4th lacing tube is a lock similar to the MCB.
    [attachment=16050:7.jpg]

    Here's a closer look at the 'strut"...my only complaint with the lacing is the use of open hooks instead of enclosed to keep the laces under control if they become untied...
    [attachment=16051:8.jpg]

    Here is the sole of the boot again it has a 90 degree heel...
    [attachment=16052:9.jpg]

    Again it has a padded scree collar and tongue...
    [attachment=16053:10.jpg]

    These boots have served me very well for awhile now and are a very light boot for a class "C" boot in part due to the nylon "strut" They have worked well with snow shoes and crampons. I have no real complains about them other the the open hook lacing.

    And finally for a comparison to the two more modern boots with the "Old School' mountain combat boot. This is a pair of German Bundeswehr Gibergsjager boots, mountain infantry. They haven't changed much since WWII other than the padded scree collar and tongue. They do lack the old hat screwed soles and triconies lol. the soles are made by "Continental" who also make tires
    [attachment=16054:11.jpg]

    Again a side view, notice the 90 degree heel. The lower lacing is D rings with the locking hook above.
    [attachment=16055:12.jpg]

    They do have the "modern" padded scree collar and tongue...
    [attachment=16056:13.jpg]

    And finally a side view of the three boots, notice how similar they appear feature wise, scree collars, 90 degree heels, some type of lace lock, and heavy stiff soles. All three are good boots for the mountain infantryman still. If you're going into the high mountains these are what you need, those "sneaker/tennis shoe things' will get you hurt or worse stranded. The next step up would be a hard shell boot, these have a hard polymer shell for the foot with a leather liner boot and for serious very high mountain treking.

    I hope this explains a little of what to look for in a mountain boot or a class "C" hiker/treker. These are for carrying a heavy ruck in very rough terrain you don't need them for impressing the counter girls at McDonalds or the boys at the gun shop. I've worn these in the Rocky mountains, Afghanistan and now Korea all do what they are intended to do and do it well. The 950's and the gebirgsjager boots are heavy duty combat boots, the asolos are light and I even carry these to change into once the heavy works done You'll notive too, none of them are rough out leather, that stuff only wicks water into the boots.

    The older boots did have some nice features, like heel plates, trioconies and assorted steel on the soles and heels in the "olde days" the miners in Leadville used to wince when they heard that metal on the sidewalks in town heading to the "Silver Dollar Saloon"...you should have seen the nice damage it did to a shin during a "bar discussion" lol They soon learned never, never grab a mountain infantryman from behind Shredded shins "I shouldda stayed home with the old lady..." We were trained to use the boots to rake the enemies shins and introduce him to our ice axe a few times when disputing just who is the King of the mountain

    Take care...Jim
    Attached Files
    "A FAMILY THAT STANDS TOGETHER AND FIGHTS TOGETHER STAYS TOGETHER" The combined Dutch Family...


    "But I've a rendezvous with Death, at midnight in some flaming town, when spring trips north again this year, and I to my pledge word am true, I shall not fail that rendezvous"

    Alan Seeger, KIA Belloy-en-Santerre 4 July 1916, Legion Entrangere, American poet.



  • #2
    Nice write up JY.

    The new ones are pretty slick looking.

    I've been running a set of Merrell Wilderness (very similar to the German Bundeswehr Gibergsjager boots)......going on 12 years now

    I like the old school full leather boots.

    In a pinch, you could eat them (if Shep hasn't cooked your leg out if it first).....hard to do with the new fangled ones


    Hanley

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    • #3
      Hi Hanley;

      Thank you! I had a set of Merrells, the Melleniums I believe, awhile back, nice hikers, had a mesh type body for coolness, nice LOL, I just noticed the puppy fur all over the boots, we got a yellow Jindo puppy for the house and he's getting rid of his puppy fur for spring. He was helping me take the photos over the week end lol. I think he could eat all three pairs of boots with no trouble!

      Take care, my friend...Jim
      "A FAMILY THAT STANDS TOGETHER AND FIGHTS TOGETHER STAYS TOGETHER" The combined Dutch Family...


      "But I've a rendezvous with Death, at midnight in some flaming town, when spring trips north again this year, and I to my pledge word am true, I shall not fail that rendezvous"

      Alan Seeger, KIA Belloy-en-Santerre 4 July 1916, Legion Entrangere, American poet.


      Comment


      • #4
        Hi:
        Has the "Army" or "Marines" ever issued a boot with Thinsulate?.I like your review.Does the area where you at now have any thing like serpentine?

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine_group

        I live in Oregon and it's like a green obsiden it eats up "Cheap boots" real quick

        Thanks
        Scott

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Scott;

          The problem with thinsulate is if you take them off at night in the mountains and it's ciold is when you put them on in the morning the also hold the cold for a long while.I can't remember any issue boots with it. The best insulated boots I have are a pear of Herman Survivors that Wiggy's insulated with "lamalite" spelling? These a a "combat boot" design and feel like you're putting on a pair of boxing gloves on your feet...nice

          Korea has a few inactive and one active valcano, so yes we have similar obsidian scree around. Baekdu Mountain is still active on the North Korean/China border and they fear the last nuclear test by North Korea may cause an eruption. "The Punchbowl" is an inactive crater on the south side of the DMZ in the east and was the area of the Korean war battles of "Bloody Ridge" and "Porkchop Hill" is close by. The predominant rock is granite in the TaeBaek Mountain range though.

          Take care...Jim
          "A FAMILY THAT STANDS TOGETHER AND FIGHTS TOGETHER STAYS TOGETHER" The combined Dutch Family...


          "But I've a rendezvous with Death, at midnight in some flaming town, when spring trips north again this year, and I to my pledge word am true, I shall not fail that rendezvous"

          Alan Seeger, KIA Belloy-en-Santerre 4 July 1916, Legion Entrangere, American poet.


          Comment


          • #6
            Jim my friend .... This is mountain combats boots !
            [attachment=16178:803316028055008.jpg]
            Attached Files
            " IF AT FIRST YOU DON'T SUCCEED, USE DUCT TAPE !" said Uncle Bowe

            Comment


            • #7
              [quote]
              Jim my friend .... This is mountain combats boots !
              [attachment=16178:803316028055008.jpg][/b]

              I'll bet those are comfy when hiking.
              "Do the right thing even if it means dying like a dog when no one's there to see you do it." Vice Admiral James Stockdale, NAVY PILOT

              "Honor, Integrity, Commitment to core values. When they become abstract concepts or "ideals", all is lost." Me.

              "Character is doing the right thing, even when no one is looking." J.C. Watts

              "I have never seen a projectile turn in flight and come back at the ship that fired it, I cannot however make that same statement regarding missiles." Me.

              Deus lo vult! = "God wills it!"

              Comment


              • #8
                LOL, maybe when I was in the Wahkan Corridore, a little shiney though, my friend. Mount Jiri-san (Chiri-san) here in Korea is only 6,283 feet. Heck my home in Colorado sits at 10,000 feet and I wear light hikers there Only wear a class C when going up a 12,000 footer or more in Colorado. Heck we only wore class C's and OR gaiters in and around the Wakjir Pass at 16,152 feet, gotta fight in those boots not slalom in the sun they do call us mountain infantry, our definition includes long walks, uh, INFANTRY As in "feets don't fail me now" ..."ZULU-1 actual can your team climb down to where a chopper can reach and extract you?" Rangers lead the way, and have shiney white teeth...

                Take care, my friend...Jim
                "A FAMILY THAT STANDS TOGETHER AND FIGHTS TOGETHER STAYS TOGETHER" The combined Dutch Family...


                "But I've a rendezvous with Death, at midnight in some flaming town, when spring trips north again this year, and I to my pledge word am true, I shall not fail that rendezvous"

                Alan Seeger, KIA Belloy-en-Santerre 4 July 1916, Legion Entrangere, American poet.


                Comment


                • #9
                  You are welcome anytime if you want to ski next winter !
                  " IF AT FIRST YOU DON'T SUCCEED, USE DUCT TAPE !" said Uncle Bowe

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