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  • Brits use bayonet charge to achieve victory

    Combination of aggression and doing what the enemy does not expect
    Attached Files
    www.precision-applications.com

    It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

    Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

    "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

  • #2
    Gotta love the Brits!

    I for one am glad we don't have to do the 1776 thing again.
    "Do the right thing even if it means dying like a dog when no one's there to see you do it." Vice Admiral James Stockdale, NAVY PILOT

    "Honor, Integrity, Commitment to core values. When they become abstract concepts or "ideals", all is lost." Me.

    "Character is doing the right thing, even when no one is looking." J.C. Watts

    "I have never seen a projectile turn in flight and come back at the ship that fired it, I cannot however make that same statement regarding missiles." Me.

    Deus lo vult! = "God wills it!"

    Comment


    • #3
      I guess they never watched Brave Heart!
      John 3:16
      "For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.

      Romans 12:1-2
      Therefore, I urge you, brothers, in view of God's mercy, to offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God--this is your spiritual act of worship. [2] Do not conform any longer to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God's will is--his good, pleasing and perfect will.

      If you find your self in a fair fight, your tactics suck!- Marine 1st Sergeant Jim Ryfinger

      Comment


      • #4
        $this->unconvert_size(18, <span style="font-family:Garamond">HARDCORE</span>)
        "It's better to live one day as a lion, than one hundred years as a sheep", Old Roman Proverb.
        "For those who have fought for it, freedom has a flavor the protected will never know", Author Unknown.
        "Cry havoc and let slip the dogs of war!", Shakespeare, Julius Ceaser, Act III, Scene I.

        Comment


        • #5
          Gotta love the balls and the discipline these soldiers exhibited. Wonder of any of the remaining towelheads go back and report "wtf I thought you said the infidels were pussy's and cowards!!!"

          http://www.greatwardifferent.com/Great_War...t_Charge_01.htm
          " May God have mercy upon my enemies, because I won't" General George S.Patton

          " Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading"

          " The will to survive is not as important as the will to prevail...the answer to criminal aggression is retaliation" Lt. Col. Jeff Cooper

          Comment


          • #6
            Looks like the Brits are 2 for 2 when it comes to bayonet assaults!

            British officer wins two gallantry awards for fending off Taliban attack with bayonet

            A young British officer, Lieutenant James Adamson, who won two gallantry awards while serving in Afghanistan has told how he fended off an enemy attack by bayoneting a Taliban fighter to death.

            Lieutenant James Adamson was awarded the Military Cross after killing two insurgents during close quarter combat in Helmand's notorious "Green Zone".

            The 24-year-old officer, a member of the 5th battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, revealed that he shouted "have some of this" before shooting dead a gunman who had just emerged from a maize field.

            The officer was one of 145 members of the armed services who last week received awards in the latest Operational Honours list.

            In a graphic description of the intense fighting in Helmand, the officer told of the moment killed the second fighter. He said: "It was a split second decision.

            "I either wasted vital seconds changing the magazine on my rifle or went over the top and did it more quickly with the bayonet.

            "I took the second option. I jumped up over the bank of the river. He was just over the other side, almost touching distance.

            "We caught each other's eye as I went towards him but by then, for him, it was too late. There was no inner monologue going on in my head I was just reacting in the way that I was trained.

            "He was alive when it went in – he wasn't alive when it came out – it was that simple."

            Recalling his feelings in the moments afterwards Lt Adamson, said: "He was young, with dark hair. He only had kind of whispy hair on his chin, not a proper beard, so he wasn't that old, maybe a teenager.

            "Afterwards, when he was dead, I picked up his PKM (Russian-made belt-fed machine gun) machine gun and slung it over my back.

            "We then had to wait for more of my men to join us. We thought there could be more Taliban about and we were just watching our arcs of fire, waiting for more to come out of a big field of maize which came right up to the river we had been wading through.

            "One of my men, Corporal Billy Carnegie, reached us, looked at the two dead Taliban on the ground and then saw the blood on my bayonet and said "boss what the **** have you been doing?"

            The firefight, in July 2008, began during the middle an operation to push the Taliban out of an area close to the town of Musa Qala in northern Helmand.

            Lt Adamson's platoon of 25-men, which was leading the assault, had just halted their advance when they were attacked.

            Lt Adamson, who is single and comes from the Isle of Man, was moving between two eight man sections when a group of Taliban fighters attempted a flanking attack.

            He continued: "The Taliban kept on probing us – sending in fighters to attack, first in twos then in fours.

            "There was a gap between the two sections and the Taliban realised this and were sending in men to get between the two groups so they could split us up and isolate us.

            "Myself and Corporal Fraser 'Hammy' Hamilton were wading nipple deep down a river which connected the two positions. Hammy was ahead when the Taliban fighter with the PKM (Russian machine gun) appeared from a maize field.

            "There was an exchange of fire and 'Hammy' fired off his ammunition and then the weight of fire coming from the Taliban forced him under the water.

            "The machine-gunner had also gone to ground but was still firing in our direction periodically. I had just caught up when 'Hammy' came up out of the water like a monster of the deep.

            "Then another Taliban man came through the maize carrying an AK47. He was only three to four metres away.

            "I immediately shot him with a burst from my rifle which was already set on automatic. He went down straight away and I knew I had hit him.

            "Hammy said I shouted: 'have some of this' as I shot him but I can't remember that. I fired another burst at the PKM gunner and then that was me out of ammunition as well.

            "That was when I decided to use the bayonet on him. It was a case of one second to bayonet him or two seconds to put on a fresh magazine.
            "Nothing was really going through my mind but briefly I did think 'if this works out the boys will love it' – as in the rest of the platoon that I commanded.
            "The undergrowth is so dense in the 'Green zone' that I often ordered bayonets fixed because you knew the distances between you and the Taliban could be very short. It is also good for morale."
            His Military Cross citation read: "Adamson's supreme physical courage, combined with the calm leadership he continued to display after a very close encounter with the Taliban, were of the very highest order.

            "His actions also neutralised an enemy flanking attack which could have resulted in casualties for his platoon."

            Two weeks earlier Lt Adamson had won a Mention in Dispatches (MID) by leading his men in an ambush against the Taliban in the same area.

            It is understood that the young lieutenant is the first member of the armed forces to receive two awards for gallantry during the same operational tour.[/b]
            www.precision-applications.com

            It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

            Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

            "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

            Comment


            • #7
              The Royal Regiment of Scotland[/b]
              That says it all....
              Steve

              Comment


              • #8
                [quote]
                "We caught each other's eye as I went towards him but by then, for him, it was too late. There was no inner monologue going on in my head I was just reacting in the way that I was trained.

                "He was alive when it went in – he wasn't alive when it came out – it was that simple."[/b]

                OUTSTANDING!!!!!!! GOD BLESS THESE WARRIORS
                " May God have mercy upon my enemies, because I won't" General George S.Patton

                " Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading"

                " The will to survive is not as important as the will to prevail...the answer to criminal aggression is retaliation" Lt. Col. Jeff Cooper

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hearing the Command for "Fix Bayonettes" isnt something any grunt wants to hear. During the battle of little round top the union forces routed the rebs who outnumbered them greatly. This example if intestinal fortitude is still an instructional topic in military manuals and West Point. Doing it when you still have available ammunition is a statement in Insanity at best, Brass Balls at worst. Got my vote for the Huge Marbles award.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The British Army definately still like the bayonet. We have found a bayonet worthwhile in the close contacts of thick vegetation in the agricultural zones. I have been told that Americans no longer teach or practice bayonet drill in basic training. Is that true or BS?
                    My old regiment have been cited a few times for their use of the bayonet in Iraq/ Afghanistan. Infact, below is a link to the story of Cpl Sean Jones who, only last September, was awarded the Military Cross (our third highest gallantry medal) for fighting his way out of an ambush with a bayonet charge that routed the insurgent force. The link has a short piece of video where they interview him.


                    http://www.army.mod.uk/news/24462.aspx

                    "Sean said: “We had to react quickly. There was something different about this. It was obviously a well-planned ambush and they overwhelmed us with fire from three points initially.”

                    Remaining static was not an option. Firing a rocket at one of the insurgent positions, Sean ordered three of his men to fix bayonets before breaking cover and leading them across 80 metres of open ground raked by enemy fire.

                    He said: “I asked them if they were happy. They were all quite young lads and the adrenalin was racing. I shouted "follow me" and we went for it.

                    “I got ‘Commander’s Legs’ on and was going very quickly. I realised I’d left them behind a bit so had to slow down and was engaged again so I organised my guys who started attacking the enemy firing points.”

                    As two of the soldiers provided fire support, Sean prepared a hand grenade for the final assault. He raced towards an alley and was about to throw the grenade but realised the buildings were occupied so put the grenade away.

                    But the speed, aggression and audacity of his response caused the insurgents to fall back in disarray"
                    "I know why the sun never sets on the British Empire: God would never trust an Englishman in the dark." Duncan Spaeth (1868-1954

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      OOHRAH to my Limey brothers!

                      While I've been told that the Army doesn't place much emphasis on it, the USMC still considers it important. Bayonet and pugil stick drills are still a big part of boot camp and School of Infantry.
                      www.precision-applications.com

                      It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

                      Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

                      "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The Royal Regiment of Scotland[/b]
                        That says it all....
                        Steve
                        [/b]
                        AND hailing from the Isle of Man. Quite a combination.

                        Comment

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