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Dang good read on gun lubricants

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  • Dang good read on gun lubricants

    http://grantcunningham.com/lubricants101.html
    www.precision-applications.com

    It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

    Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

    "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

  • #2
    Once again this site proves that I know very little. LMAO.

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    • #3
      The reason that I posted it was because I learned a lot from it
      www.precision-applications.com

      It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

      Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

      "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

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      • #4
        I love this site with everyone out there bring stuff to the table I learn so much its awesome once again
        Wanna discount ? Sign up free at www.Magnumforceballistics.com and then email me your new user name and tell me you are a member of Sniper Paradise and I will set you up so that everything and everytime you purchase you will get an automatic discount at check out!

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        • #5
          This is a very good read however, one must look at several other things before deciding on which form of lubricant to use. First depending on the tolerances of the metals any lubricant can also cause damage due to the fact you can't compress a liquid. We know this because it is how hydraulics works. As I've said for many years now, get that oil out of your bore before you shoot a bullet down it.

          When two metals working together with that close of tolerances any lube can cause the metal to bend or bulge. The boundary type lubricant are great for parts that don't have those tight, close tolerances. It can provide protection without causing wear or damage to the metal itself.

          The other consideration is rust! We must protect our weapons from rust constantly. Lubricants with silicone have caused many problems over the years as well. A drop of oil with silicone will protect the surface the drop is sitting on however, around that small molecule the silicone will attract moisture. Moisture will collect around the molecule and rust will start in a matter of hours.

          A lot of folks like molly for bullets. Many of us tried them about 15+ years ago. We were getting about 1500 rounds from our magnum rifles before needing to set the chamber back a few inches because of tiny cracks developing in the throat of the bore. Many of us tried the molly thinking this would slow down the process. Wrong! What happened was the molly after a few rounds and extreme heat would turn dang near to gravel. Now, imagine your bullet riding down the bore on gravel. It didn't take us long t learn molly wasn't the answer. Especially when we only got about half life from our barrels.

          On the other hand there are the folks that don't clean their bore at all. Again, education is key. When we shoot a weapon the barrel gets hot, as it cools it draws in moisture. Two opposing metals and moisture breed electrolysis. This is when steel and copper bonded by heat starts to eat away at each other. Soon what happens is your barrel start copper fouling terrible and we don't understand why. You take it to a gunsmith and with a borescope we find huge pieces of the bore are gone! Yes, I've seen this many times myself, looking at students barrels at the smiths.

          Some shooters think if they leave the bore dirty it won't change their cold bore impact. Usually clean, cold bore impact change is caused by oil in the bore. Yes, even if you run a patch down the bore, that fine film of oil will cause the bullet to travel faster down the bore thus changing the point of impact, at the same time the bullet is trying to push the oil out of the way. I've actually seen barrels that a shooter shot with oil in the bore and the barrel bulged. A patch of alcohol and then a few dry patches will cure this impact change problem on about 90% of weapons.

          These are how lubricants can help or harm our weapons. Now, by all means I clean and lubricate all my weapons. I usually clean after each day at the range, regardless of how many shots I've taken. If I'm going to the range the following day I don't put oil in the bore. If I store my weapon, oil is in the bore. Locking lugs will have a light coating of high compression grease applied to them. You have to understand that when we fire a shot in our weapons (example .308 win.) there is about 52,000 cup pounds of pressure in the chamber. This pressure causes the bullet to be pushed down the bore. Also if causes the bolt to slam back against the lug recesses. Without high pressure lube gaulding of the lugs metal surfaces will occur in a short amount of time. Make no mistake here, the most accurate round down a barrel is your clean cold bore shot. Why? No obstructions, like copper, lead or fouling.

          Take care, flea
          "with the patience of an oyster....I watch and wait"

          Training the US, one shooter at a time.






          http://www.centralvirginiatactical.com

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          • #6

            One of the mysteries drifting around the double gun world is something refered to as OSR or outside rifling. Where something has happened to the gun during the process of firing it that the rifling can be seen on the the out side of the barrel and in a worse case scenario ruining the barrels... these guns quite often are over a 100 yrs old and the barrels are usually Whitworth fluid steel and are quite soft in comparison to todays barrels...Please realize that these are very careful folks who take great pride in owning and shooting these guns and are very cautious in what they feed them. The biggest finger to date has been pointed at monolithic bullets such as the Barnes solids saying that they are not forgiving when they pass through old sof steel barrels, but when you listen to the Barnes spokes people they claim that their bullets are more gentle than some of the more coventional solids (steel jacketed lead core) due to their driving bands etc. I'm wondering if your comment on oil in the barrel may be something that has been overlooked as a culprit to the cause of OSR..
            Any thoughts would be appreciated.
            Thanks Bob Rose
            Will be at the shoot the 2nd week of may

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            • #7
              Hey "Zephyr",

              When did that master of yours send you to school and teach you to type???? Can you outshoot him too? He says he can out point you!

              Ct3f
              "Cogito, ergo armatum sum: I think, therefore I am armed" Dave Grossman
              "Be a Sheepdog".......R.A. Nable
              ...It could be that the purpose of your life is only to serve as a warning to others......
              ?Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit upon his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats?.
              Henry Louis Mencken, American writer of the early 20th century, satirist, and cynic.

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              • #8
                Zephyr - There could be several contributory factors to rifling "print through" in a double rifle.

                First and most obvious would be "soft" steel. This is a bit of a misnomer. The steel just isn't as strong, and it takes less force to work the metal past its modulus of elasticity into permanent deformation. Add to this that double barrels are not all that thick walled, in some cases not much more than rifled shotgun barrels.

                Second might be inapropriate bullet diameter for the land and groove diameter combination of the barrels in question.

                Third would be excessive lubricant left in the barrel. Oil films are funny things, they "wedge" on the leading edge of sliding contact and like virtually all liquids they are not compressible. Excessive oil would be about the same as firng an over diameter projectile.

                Another seldom considered factor is construction of the load. When using modern powders in older large capacity cartridges the case fill of powder is such that wadding is used to take up the excess volume and keep the powder nearer the powder. Synthetic fibers have proven to damage chambers. The synthetic fibers melt and hit the base of the bullet with extreme force, the force is directed perpendicularly from the center line of the bore by the bass of the bullet, as the bullet acts as a bore obstruction. The general consensus among shooters using valauble original black powder firearms with modern powders is to use untreated medical grade cotton and as little of that as possible.


                And of course, a a worst case combination of the above could be ruinous.
                ?Laws are like a spider web, in that it snares the poor and weak while the rich and powerful break them.
                Solon, ancient Greece

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