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  • Barrel break-in procedures

    Break-in and cleaning guide.

    Always clear the weapon and make sure it is unloaded.

    Before shooting your new rifle, ALWAYS clean the bore. There may be debris in the bore from shipping.

    Break-in
    Shoot three shots and clean twice
    Shoot 6 shots and clean once
    Shoot 12 shots and clean
    For the first 100 shots, clean every 25-30 rounds
    After the first 100 rounds, clean when accuracy starts to degrade.
    Done.


    Cleaning
    Always use a good copper solvent such as Montana Xtreme 50BMG™, Spooge™, Shooters Choice™, or Sweets 7.62™.
    Always run three wet patches one way through, discarding each patch. This will rid your bore of carbon that can be dangerous if “scrubbed” into the bore.

    Run a wet brush 10 strokes and let sit. This allows the copper solvent to work.
    Dry patch and inspect. If copper can still be seen, run a wet patch followed by the wet brush again.

    When you see very little or no copper, dry patch. Then run 5 alcohol patches to clear the solvent out.
    DO NOT use Hoppes to do this with. IT DOES NOT WORK! You will have copper solvent mixed with Hoppes in your bore. This will cause fouling!

    After the alcohol patches, run a dry patch and be sure to clean your chamber of any solvents.

    DONE
    www.precision-applications.com

    It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

    Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

    "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

  • #2
    Hello there. I was reading your article about breaking in a barrel. I wish I knew about how many times to clean the boar. I just bought a new T3 Tikka 243. I am in the process of making it dead on. Hope to hear from yah.

    Comment


    • #3
      If you are asking how often to clean the barrel while shooting (after a proper break-in has been done), you'll get many answers.

      I clean whenever I notice a degradation in accuracy. Regardless of that, I always clean when I am done shooting for the day.

      If it's a rifle that is being carried around a lot, and not shot (like a hunting rifle), I punch the bore at the end of each day to keep the crud out, and wipe out the chamber.
      www.precision-applications.com

      It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

      Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

      "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

      Comment


      • #4
        Hey CMSHOOT I have a question on breaking in a barrel. I Got my Dad's Remi 700 243 finally from my Stepmother from hell. It has taken her since Feb of this yr. to get it to me. I know Dad never broke this rifle in the way you all describe it. And even if he did I wouldnt know. But hell I know Pop didnt. My question is. Can I still break the barrel in? I know it has been fired at least 100 to 200 hundred times. I have cleaned the hell out of it but I still see copper and it appears to still have powder residue in it. I clean it until the patches come out clean but I still see it in the barrel. Any suggestions?????????????????? Thanks Casey.
        No man knows how bad he is, until he has tried very hard to be good.
        C.S. Lewis

        Comment


        • #5
          You can't really break it in, but it can be helped.

          First thing you are going to have to do is clean all the copper out. A good scrubbing with Montana Extreme .50BMG solvent and USB Bore Paste should do it.

          Here's another method that will clean it out for sure. I got this years ago from a benchrest shooter:

          You will need:
          1. A good, one piece coated cleaning rod (Dewey, Bore Tech, Tipton, etc.)
          2. Proper size cleaning jag (you can also use a bore brush one caliber smaller for this as it will hang onto the patch better)
          3. Patches
          4. Cleaning rod guide
          5. JB Bore Compound
          6. Any gun cleaning solvent (I use Hoppe’s #9)
          7. The ability to boil water. If you can’t do that, just stop here and send your rifle to me for safe keeping, as you are too much of a danger to yourself with a firearm

          Some things that you don’t need, but it will make it much easier.
          1. A long funnel that will fit tightly in the chamber. I bought mine at an auto parts store. It looks like a standard funnel with a long, flexible hose attached, probably for work with transmissions or such. The end fits perfectly in a .308 chamber.
          2. A well-mounted bench vise with a pivoting head. You will be working with the barrel both horizontally and vertically, and it will get hot. I did this for years before I got a vise, the vise just makes it easier. If you don’t have a vise, use oven mitts and the kitchen sink.
          3. VFG bore cleaning pellets and jag (replaces the cleaning jag and patches)
          4. Rod stops

          The cleaning process
          1. Remove the barreled action from the stock. Here is where I grab the barreled action in the vise. I also place an empty 5 gallon bucket underneath where I will be working.
          2. Grab the barreled action in the padded vise. I use blocks of wood to pad the jaws for this.
          3. Rotate the vise so that the barrel is vertical and muzzle down.
          4. Insert your funnel into the chamber. Pour 1 quart of boiling water down the bore.
          5. Immediately turn the rifle horizontal and insert your rod guide.
          6. Coat a patch (or your VFG Bore Cleaning pellets) liberally with JB
          7. Lap the barrel 10X, with a stroke up and back being one stroke. Try to keep from going all the way out of the barrel on either end if you are using patches, as they can come off of the jag. The rod stops are great to use here if you have them. A piece of masking tape on the rod to mark the limit will work, also.
          8. Clean out the JB’s with 2 patches wet with Hoppe’s followed by a dry one.
          9. Repeat steps 4-8 for a total of 5X. This is enough for a new barrel. One that is excessively foul may need more, but I have never seen one that wouldn’t clean with 5 runs.
          10. After the 5th session, I run several patches with Hoppe’s through the bore and scrub out the chamber and receiver, also. Then I run dry patches down the bore and thoroughly dry the chamber and receiver. That’s followed by a little Tetra grease on the bolt ways for lube.
          11. Make sure there is no water on the outside of the rifle and reassemble into the stock, torqueing the action screws to 65 in/lbs.

          This process does several things. The hot water heats the factory fouling up, softening it and making it easier to remove. It also heats the barrel, opening the pores in the metal and enabling you to get it really clean. I usually do this once a year to the rifles I shoot regularly as part of my routine maintenance. If you have a rifle that is really fouled this will clean it out.
          A friend of mine bought a used, tuned PSS from a guy who complained that it wouldn’t group anymore, saying it probably needed a new barrel. I cleaned it after my friend shot it for .75MOA to 1 MOA groups at 100yds. After this cleaning process it was down to sub-.5MOA. A tuned VS fluted I used to own shot it’s best group ever, 5 shots into .26 inches at 100 yards, immediately after I did this to it for the first time.


          After you have it good and cleaned, if it continues to foul up on you, contact flea for his method of handlapping the barrel.
          www.precision-applications.com

          It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

          Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

          "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank you very much. I'll try that. Thanks Casey.
            No man knows how bad he is, until he has tried very hard to be good.
            C.S. Lewis

            Comment


            • #7
              Hey Casey,

              Did you use a good copper solvent on it? That should take the fouling out.

              What also works well for me is the IOSSO bore paste. I put it on a mop, or patch wrapped around a well used bore brush and go for it. IOSSO is finer than jb paste, and one of the long range guys I met recommended it. I have been using it sparingly, but it really shines the bore up.
              "Do the right thing even if it means dying like a dog when no one's there to see you do it." Vice Admiral James Stockdale, NAVY PILOT

              "Honor, Integrity, Commitment to core values. When they become abstract concepts or "ideals", all is lost." Me.

              "Character is doing the right thing, even when no one is looking." J.C. Watts

              "I have never seen a projectile turn in flight and come back at the ship that fired it, I cannot however make that same statement regarding missiles." Me.

              Deus lo vult! = "God wills it!"

              Comment


              • #8
                If you asked ten riflesmiths how to break in a barrel you would get twelve answers on how to do it. I think it's more important to understand what you are trying to achieve with the process. I own a Hawkeye borescope so I am able to inspect the bore for copper fouling and monitor the process as it happens. The goal is to remove microscopic "burrs" from the bore, most especially on the corners of the lands. There are also radial tool marks in the throat that you are trying to smooth out. The bore must be CLEAN and DRY for each shot so the bullet can either burnish the rough spots or grab the burrs and strip them out. I like to completely scrub out the barrel after each shot and inspect with my bore scope. I can actually see the copper diminish as the barrel becomes smoother. For those of you who don't have access to a borescope you can feel the difference with your cleaning rod if you use a good jag and tight fitting cotton flannel patches. The bore condition in a brand new barrel is like sharkskin, it has microscopic "hairs" that lay down towards the muzzle. If you scrub back and forth with short little strokes working your way down the bore you will feel the hairs grab the patch when you pull back on the rod. As you shoot and clean you will feel the barrel smoothing up and getting easier to clean. Some barrels break in with just a few shots, some may require as many as twenty. If your rifle isn't starting to group and cleaning up easily after twenty shots you might consider having your smith hand lap the bore. I do not reccomend fire lapping unless you are a fan of lots of free bore in your barrel.
                All the above is directed towards factory barrels. If you purchase a custom barrel they are hand lapped to a beautiful smooth finish. If your smith hand stones his reamers and pumps oil down the barrel (as he should) while chambering there should be no radial tool marks in the throat therefore virtually no break in is needed, maybe five shots to make you feel good.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Any recommendations against David Tubb's product line as far as barrel break in procedures, or is this deep channel cleaning a still must do after you used his product too? I don't know what's the difference between his bullets and others. Maybe different bullet materials sent down range to properly manipulate the rifling or something? Is there any difference between your method and his? He has just recently come to me highly recommended by a few people here. I am just curious. I trust your opinions better than many others, oh Grand Poo-Bah Guru.

                  SF

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've used the David Tubb system on factory Remington's with good success, but I wouldn't use it on a true "match grade" barrel.

                    For barrel break-in now, on a new rifle with a factory barrel and a not a custom one (LW, Krieger, Bartlein, etc), I hand-lap 'em before shooting. I'll handlap 'em, fire 3 rounds and inspect, then clean. If need be, I'll repeat. I've never had to do more than a 9 round break-in when I hand-lap the bore first. Works great on factory Remingtons, and did wonders for my new CZ550 FS.
                    www.precision-applications.com

                    It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

                    Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

                    "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      MAN! some of that copper solvent will suck the wind right out of your lungs! Hey cm, you ever use a cloth swab and polishing compound on a new barrel??? We used to vise em, and run that thing full length in and out with a guide till she shined like a mirror. It gets rid of the machine marks. Just wondering.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I use VFG felt bore pellets and a super-fine lapping compound when I do it.
                        www.precision-applications.com

                        It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

                        Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

                        "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          [quote]
                          I use VFG felt bore pellets and a super-fine lapping compound when I do it.[/b]
                          VFG? What and where can I find those? Ive been using wrapped felt/cloth forever....didnt know they had something FOR that purpose! sigh.....im such a caveman.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I buy the VFG bore cleaning pellets from Brownell's
                            www.precision-applications.com

                            It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

                            Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

                            "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

                            Comment

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