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Installing mounts, rings and scopes

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  • Installing mounts, rings and scopes

    1. Degrease all the mounting holes in the receiver. I use denatured alcohol

    2. I wipe a little oil on the receiver and the bottom of the base. This is to help prevent rust between the receiver and the base, Don't get the oil in the mounting holes that you already degreased.

    3. Degrease the mounting screws and mount the base to the receiver. I use a little blue Loctite. Tighten the base to the rifle @ 15 inch/pounds. If you don't have a 15 in/lb torque wrench, then use the L-shaped wrench that comes with the mount. Insert the long end of the L into the mounting screws and grasp the short end with your thumb and index finger. Tighten as much as you comfortably can, that'll be roughly 15 in/lbs.

    4. Figure out where you want the rings placed and mount the bottom halves to the base. I apply pressure to the rear of the bottom halves, pushing them so that the crossbolt is bearing against the front of the cross slot in the base. Torque to 65 in/lbs (this is what most of the "tactical" rings with the large mounting nut call for, check the directions that come with yours). You'll have to constantly check your eye relief with the scope sitting in the bottom halves to figure out where you want the rings. I like them spaced as far apart as possible. Also, I place the rings so the mounting bolts are on the opposite side of the ejection port. Keeps stuff out of the way of the port, where you will be working when you shoot.

    (Right here is where you would lap the scope rings, if that's your plan)

    5. Place the scope in the bottom halves, at your proper eye relief, place the top halves on and screw down loosely. You need to be able to rotate the scope. Also, I lay in the prone position when I obtain my eye relief.

    6. Level the scope. I use a combination of eyeball and a Wheeler Level-Level-Level kit. When you eyeball it, just throw it to your shoulder naturally, look at it for a few seconds and take it down. If you look at it too long, it will always look crooked. The levels helps, but another tip that I have used before is to use a plump line. I made one from orange weedeater string with a weight on the end.

    7. When you have the proper eye relief, and the reticle is level, start to tighten the screws that hold the ring halves together. You want to start out with an even gap on each side of the ring. I'm talking about the gap between the ring halves.

    I start with the front ring. Looking at the top of the rings, with the rifle pointing away from you, I tighten the top right screw a 1/4 to 1/2 turn, then do the same for the bottom left screw. I repeat this over and over until they start to snug. Then I stop and check to see if the reticle is still level. If it isn't, loosen the screws and start back at step 6.

    Once those 2 screws are finger tight, and the reticle is level, I then tighten the bottom right and top left screws on the same ring. Once they are snug, I torque all 4 to 15 in/lbs. Now check the reticle for levelness again. If it isn't level, go back to step 6.

    If you have all 4 torqued and the reticle is still level, go to the back ring and start with step 7.

    The oil in step 2 and the Loctite in step 3 are both optional. I have heard arguments both ways on these uses. It's always worked for me, so I still do it.

    That's it.

    You can start with the front or rear ring, and start with whatever side, top or bottom, that you want. I do it exactly the same every time, and have for nearly 20 years. Then I know that I don't leave out a step or something. Consistency.
    www.precision-applications.com

    It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

    Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

    "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

  • #2
    Excellent advise. I have found myself getting back into the game of long range shooting lately and have come back to brush up on the knowledge I used to have, an build upon it as much as I can manage. Could you also throw in a bit about your lapping process??

    Thanks

    Cheers
    "No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms."
    -Thomas Jefferson

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    • #3
      http://snipersparadise.com/sniperchat/inde...showtopic=20738
      www.precision-applications.com

      It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

      Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

      "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

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      • #4
        Great information, thanks for sharing it!
        Admit Nothing, Deny Everything, Make Counter Accusations

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