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OPTICS FOR PRACTICAL LONG RANGE RIFLE SHOOTING

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  • #16
    Who is this Zak Smith guy anyway???

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    • #17
      Zak,
      Outstanding summation! I have one niggling question I can't get the math to work out on: Do click adjustments on CM/100 meter scopes (S&B PM II's) correspond to fractions of MILS (as in the reticle)? I thought I recently saw a post by someone who should know stating this, but as I said, I cannot make the math work... A centimeter is .39 inches, and 1/10 MIL works out to about .35, so how much does a centimeter at 100 meters subtend at 100 yards?

      dc

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      • #18
        Thanks, also liked your web site, hope you dont mind, but made copies for personal use.
        Trying to learned all the end and outs, hopefully it help save time & money.

        TG

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        • #19
          Great post Zak. Tons of detailed info
          Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.

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          • #20
            Was searching for some Horus info when I found your review. You mention the benefits of the H25 reticle, but a Horus scope doesn't make your recommendations. Why should I not buy the Horus Raptor 4-16x50? I'm a newbie so would appreciate your thoughts.

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            • #21
              Wow that was impressive. I am new to lr shooting and learned a lot from that article and actually understood it. I still have much to learn though but working on it reading as much as i can. something i have been wondering, can you use a windage tool that will tell you the angles and mph. ex.. a wind is blowing L to R but also twards you from 10 to 4 oclock and not sure but can it even be angling down some?

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              • #22
                It's best to practice reading your wind at your muzzle, then half way to the target and then at the target itself. Aggregate all three wind speeds (providing they are all going to same direction) then use wind drift (inches a bullet will move for every 1 MPH at that distance) multiply that times your wind speed and then divide it by 1 moa of the distance. This will give you the moa or mils to place in your scope.


                Take care, flea
                "with the patience of an oyster....I watch and wait"

                Training the US, one shooter at a time.






                http://www.centralvirginiatactical.com

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