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  • #2
    The great thing about the AR is you can run the whole gun with your support hand (if you are right handed) and never have to break your firing grip. You can rack the slide, clear malfunctions, do reloads, make sight adjustments and everything. Not saying that it is a bad design or will not work great, I just prefer running the gun with my support hand.
    Lifetime warranty and excellent customer service don't mean a thing when your gun fails during a zombie attack.

    "A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity." Sigmund Freud

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    • #3
      I got to spend a half day shooting one of the select-fire shorty Sig 556's recently. I was able to perform all needed functions with my support hand while keeping my strong hand in the firing position.

      Mainly shot it during drills of 50 yards and less, although we did shoot it at 50 yard increments out to 400yds. Ammunition used was Georgia Arms 55grn FMJ reloads using LC brass. Used a mixture of mags to include Colt, Bushmaster, HK and several various USGI manufactures.

      I actually prefer the side-mounted "charging handle" on the bolt to the charging handle on the AR family. I was able to keep the Sig in my shoulder and just roll the top slightly inboard to access the handle by reaching over the top (this was done with and without and Eotech mounted on it, no problems). I was still in a position to fire if need be. I liked this better than on the AR where I have to lift my head off of the rifle to pull the bolt back.

      I'm used to rolling the rifle in that manner because it's the same technique I use/teach for the AK family, M14/M1A family, and most semi-auto shotguns. Keeps all my techniques the same/similar.

      The 556 uses the AR family stocks and the grips are either the same or very similar. The feeling of that portion of the weapon was identical to an AR.

      At the end of the 1/2 day, I was very impressed with it's accuracy and reliability, although it was no more or less accurate/reliable than a good M4 carbine. What impressed me most of all was after the large amounts of ammo expended (a good bit of it using controlled bursts while set on full auto), was how much cleaner it was than an AR. Lots easier to clean and it didn't seem to have near as many of those awkward little nooks and crannies that are such a PITA to clean on an AR.

      I don't see it ever replacing the AR in America, but it's a great weapon. I like being a bit different, and that was admittedly one of the factors in making my decision to get one. With that said, I wouldn't choose to get one just to be different, unless it just happens to be as nice a system as this one is.
      www.precision-applications.com

      It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

      Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

      "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

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      • #4
        That sounds pretty good then, I am now much more interested in trying. Not intending to get knit picky, how about the slide release is it going to be a problem (fine motor skills) to get to it if you are in a stressful situation? It looks like you have to use a finger of thumb to release it. Where with the AR just slap it with the ball of you hand.
        Lifetime warranty and excellent customer service don't mean a thing when your gun fails during a zombie attack.

        "A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity." Sigmund Freud

        Comment


        • #5
          I never had a problem utilizing the bolt release, but I do like the AR version better.
          www.precision-applications.com

          It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

          Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

          "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

          Comment


          • #6
            Been thinking about this a little more and I am not sure training yourself to tilt the gun to the left is the best thing to do. I know where I have recieved my training they teach you to run those type of guns with your right hand and tilt them ejection port down. If you get a malfunction and need to clear the weapon and you have trained your muscle memory to always tilt to the left you are dumping the malfunction right back into the ejection port. It will make it much harder to clear the weapon. I think it would be better to run the gun with your firing hand and avoid that possibility all together. Those precious seconds of having to correct your self could mean everything in a CQC situation.
            Lifetime warranty and excellent customer service don't mean a thing when your gun fails during a zombie attack.

            "A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity." Sigmund Freud

            Comment


            • #7
              I use the method I described for loading a weapon when the bolt is forward on an empty chamber, or for immediate action, i.e. "S-P-O-R-T-S".

              Slap the magazine
              Pull the charging handle to the rear
              Observe for the ejection of a cartridge
              Release the charging handle
              Tap the forward assist
              Shoot

              This will clear the common malfunctions of having an empty chamber (usually caused by an unseated magazine) or a dud round/light primer strike. This will work no matter how I have the weapon canted. That's why this is "immediate" action, I should be able to perform them in no more than a couple seconds and get back up, having cleared one of the most commonly encountered problems. If I can't get back up and running in that very short amount of time, then I need to either transition to my secondary weapon or seek cover, or both.

              If immediate action doesn't clear the malfunction and I have to go to remedial action, at that point the weapon comes out of the shoulder to clear and I use both hands.

              Lock (the bolt to the rear): it ain't gonna come out with a double feed if you don't
              Rip (the magazine out): if you have a double feed, the magazine can be very hard to remove, even with the bolt locked to the rear, so you probably couldn't do it with the support hand while keeping the weapon in the shoulder anyways
              Work (the charging handle): pull the bolt fully to the rear and release it 3-4 times
              Load (a fresh magazine into the weapon): don't put the old mag back in as that may have been the source of the original trouble
              Charge (a round into the chamber)
              Shoot

              While I've yet to clear a malfunction in a Sig 556 (only shot it part of a day), in the AR platform the necessity to perform remedial action is usually caused by a double feed. Now I'm not worried so much about covering the threat direction with my FUBAR'ed and worthless weapon, I'm more worried about getting to cover and clearing it.

              If I don't have the ability to quickly get to cover to perform remedial action, then I transition to my secondary weapon, i.e. handgun, leaving the primary weapon alone until I can get to good cover and clear it. All this is assuming that I am working alone, as you can have partner(s) cover your a$$ while performing remedial action if you're working as a team.
              www.precision-applications.com

              It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

              Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

              "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes I am very aware of all the diffent types of malfunctions and how to clear them. Done them hundreds and hundreds of times on the range and in dry practice. If you get a stove pipe (I call it a type 2 malfunction) and your gun is canted so the ejection port is up when you tap your mag and rack the slide to clear it then that is where your problem arises, the brass will fall right back in causing a now spent case and a fresh round stuck in the port. If it is point down and a person is running the action with the right hand the empty falls out problem solved.
                All of my training has been self defense training, so ya I practice stuff as if I were alone which is probably much different from the training you have as it sounds. And yes I agree go with the secondary weapon and definitally seek cover. No arguement intended just pointing out potential problems I see of running a right handed gun with a left hand.
                Lifetime warranty and excellent customer service don't mean a thing when your gun fails during a zombie attack.

                "A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity." Sigmund Freud

                Comment


                • #9
                  I clear stovepipes differently then I clear a "simple" malfunction.
                  www.precision-applications.com

                  It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

                  Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

                  "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Whats your technique? I was taught to trained to clear a stovepipe and a unseated mag pretty much the same way. Maybe your way will be better for me.
                    Lifetime warranty and excellent customer service don't mean a thing when your gun fails during a zombie attack.

                    "A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity." Sigmund Freud

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      On an AR I do roll the weapon ejection port down like you suggested, but I pull the charging handle to the rear with the right hand while reaching under the weapon with the left hand to grasp the offending cartridge and pull it free, if it hasn't already fallen out by itself.

                      I only do this because I have seen stovepipes in AR's/M16's where the brass has smashed up and conformed to either the bolt or the lip of the ejection port, requiring it to be physically pulled from the weapon. When I get a stovepipe, I automatically assume "worse case scenario" and go at it with both hands.

                      None of the ways that you or I have described are wrong, they're all techniques. Ask a question of 3 different Instructors/Operators and you're likely to get 3 different answers, all of which work.

                      My "two-handed" technique does work better/easier with a weapon with a right-side charging handle as it's easier to pull the bolt back with the right handle and still control it.
                      www.precision-applications.com

                      It's knowing that when I get up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, the Devil says, "Shit! He's awake!"

                      Shortly before World War I, the German Kaiser was the guest of the Swiss government to observe military maneuvers. The Kaiser asked a Swiss militiaman: "You are 500,000 and you shoot well, but if we attack with 1,000,000 men what will you do?" The soldier replied: "We will shoot twice and go home."

                      "There are so many Russians, and our country so small, where will we find room to bury them all?" - anonymous Finnish soldier

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have never really had a stove pipe happen while I am shooting at least a serious one like you stated. I have only cleared ones that I have set up. I guess that is good as far as my gun goes, but bad for me when it actually happens since I have never dealt with a serious one. Good to know that two hands may be necessary to deal with it.

                        Well you certainly have me interested in the Sig, after I get my new IOR for my 700 I may have to look into getting one.
                        Lifetime warranty and excellent customer service don't mean a thing when your gun fails during a zombie attack.

                        "A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity." Sigmund Freud

                        Comment

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